Menu

San Francisco: 415.626.2320
Newport Beach: 949.759.1362
La Jolla: 858.729.9854
Toll free: 877.626.2336

I have worked on many intriguing projects throughout my career – from the design of an antique car museum to a rustic 1906 log lodge – but one of the most interesting of late was overseeing the interior design of the broadcast set for San Diego’s newest television station, U-T TV, a station recently launched by San Diego’s daily newspaper, U-T San Diego.

We worked in conjunction with general contractor and longtime colleague Bob Petrossian of Landmark Hospitality Contracting Inc. and partnered with seasoned lighting designers Matt McAdam and Darran Web – veterans of high profile television shows like American Idol.

Anchor Taylor Baldwin on the U-T TV set. Since the set is a high-traffic area, we used durable flooring, faux finished by hand to resemble polished onyx marble and black granite.

Anchor Taylor Baldwin on the U-T TV set. Since the set is a high-traffic area, we used durable flooring, faux finished by hand to resemble polished onyx marble and black granite.

Not surprisingly, what made this space especially unique was the lighting. Working alongside seasoned Hollywood lighting experts we constructed and designed the first broadcast set to exclusively use LED lighting. LED, light-emitting diode, is a technology that produces light differently from incandescent light resulting in beautiful and dramatic color changing effects produced from a single light source.

Appropriately, the studio’s backdrop includes San Diego iconic images such as Balboa Park, Del Mar horse races, downtown and the beach, all selected from the U-T San Diego photo archives capturing “America’s Finest City” in a multitude of formats. Because the set needed to be fluid and ever-changing, we installed Duratrans light boxes to reflect the many themes of San Diego. Using these methods, we can take a projected scene and throw light at it from behind, appearing “alive,” not fixed.

Since the set is a high-traffic area, we used durable flooring (faux finished by hand to resemble polished onyx marble and black granite), as well as exotic wood veneers, marble and bronze, all accented by our key design component, the specialty LED lighting. Vertical segments at the base of the broadcast set are lit from behind and can be accented with different colors and intensity.

A project not without challenges, our biggest consideration: ceiling height. The studio sits on the third floor of an office building, so height limitations were extreme. We had only 9 ½ feet work with, and we had to drop the ceiling to conceal mechanical equipment.

This overall hot of U-T TV shows the dramatic effects of LED lighting.

This overall shot of U-T TV shows the dramatic effects of LED lighting.

A space’s design is all about perception by the human eye. In this case, however, we had to consider how the area would be perceived through a camera’s eye, its lens. During the initial design process, we lacked the camera view, so we couldn’t actually see how the set would appear on screen. Talk about a challenge. I had to make my best delicately balanced “guestimate” – thankfully, it worked. For example, I was careful not to use broad expanses of color because other camera shots wouldn’t be able to capture the delineation of the layout.

This was a fast-tracked project using the most cutting-edge equipment available today. Through our extensive research and visits to other Southern California studios, we know that what we have produced at U-T TV is leaps ahead of the industry.

Taylor Baldwin at the U-T TV anchor desk.  We used exotic wood veneers as well as marble and bronze accents. Vertical segments at the base of the set are lit from behind and can be accented with different colors and intensity.

Taylor Baldwin at the U-T TV anchor desk. We used exotic wood veneers as well as marble and bronze accents. Vertical segments at the base of the set are lit from behind and can be accented with different colors and intensity.

I love that Warren Sheets Design has a repertoire of unique, exciting one-of-a-kind projects that require high levels of creativity and expertise, and this project certainly was no different.

Tell me about your biggest design challenge. What creative steps did you take to overcome?

Tagged with:
 

A historic home in Woodside, a small Northern California town in San Mateo County, is the site of the 2013 Peninsula Volunteers Decorator Show House, which is now open through May 24.

The 2013 Decorator Show House features classic Monterey Colonial architecture.

The 2013 Decorator Show House features classic Monterey Colonial architecture.

With classic Monterey Colonial architecture, the home features elements from both Spanish Colonial and New England Colonial styles. Homes in the classic California Monterey style – including the Show House – are typically two stories, with a second story balcony with wood or wrought iron balustrades, a low-pitched tiled or shingled gable roof and exterior walls of contrasting materials such as wood, stucco and brick. This type of architecture is traced to an 1837 Monterey, Calif., home built by Thomas Larkin, America’s first and only consul to California.

Originally built in 1938, the Show House is located on property that was once part of a Spanish land grant given to Simon Mezes by the widow of Luis Arguello, an early California governor. W. R. Voorhies was the original architect, and Carter Warr updated the home 20 years ago.

Spanning 11,000 square feet, this beautiful building is situated on 21 acres, surrounded by gardens, stables and majestic views of the countryside. A selection of 20 rooms is styled and decorated by premier Bay Area design firms, among them Warren Sheets Design, Inc.

We have transformed the living room and our designs pay homage to some of the world’s most creative artistic forces. With this in mind, the space has become veritable museum of fine art and artifacts. A select highlight is the room’s focal point: “Trousdale,” a bronze cocktail table fabricated by Paul Ferrante.

Our space is a tribute to some of the world’s most creative artistic forces. Over the mantel is “Three Ladies,” an unknown artist’s interpretation of a piece by Fernand Leger.

Our space is a tribute to some of the world’s most creative artistic forces. Over the mantel is “Three Ladies,” an unknown artist’s interpretation of a piece by Fernand Leger.

Additional fine touches include “Three Ladies,” an unknown artist’s oil on canvas interpretation of a piece by Fernand Leger; an abstract artwork by Linn Thygeson; a satin block L’architect writing desk from Baker Knapp and Tubbs created by French artist Andre Arbus; and a Chantilly white linen drapery fabric from Manuel Canovas. Tying together the past with the present, this room combines elements of classic and contemporary design, mixing energetic hues of orchid pink and peacock blue with classic metallic gold and silver leaf accents.

We are proud to be part of a group of more than 15 noted designers, as well as artists, master gardeners and garden designers, working magic on this beautiful, landmark estate.

While this home showcases the work of many Bay Area top talents and offers a glimpse of California’s colorful architectural history, its most important role is the financial support it will generate for Peninsula Volunteers, which has developed programs, properties and services to support seniors for 65 years. Proceeds will fund the organization’s four major senior programs: Meals on Wheels, Little House Activity Center, Rosener House Adult Day Services and its low income Partridge-Kennedy and Crane Place apartments.

The fireplace stone surround in our living room space is fabricated with Da Vinci Marble.

The fireplace stone surround in our living room space is fabricated with Da Vinci Marble.

For tickets and information, visit www.penvol.org or call (650) 381-9933. Please let me know if you attend and what you think.

Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On Linkedin